Set in concrete

When our alarm sounded at 3 am last Thursday, I hopped out of bed to brew the first of three pots of coffee to take to our jobsite along with assorted donuts and pastries for our crew.  We arrived an hour later to see that our pour was already underway!

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War of the Worlds?  Nah, a concrete pump!

Apologies to our wonderful (and, hopefully, understanding) neighbors for the ridiculously early morning noise and mayhem.  Thing is, concrete doesn’t cure properly in our extreme Texas heat so we must pour before daylight.   We’ve watered the foundation to keep it cool for several days afterward, hope it helped.

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Keeping it cool.

House framing and hangar construction to start this week, will keep you posted.

Happy flying,

~Jaqui
Jaqui Freund, SMP
Realtor® & Aviation Property Specialist
Realty Associates

Phone: (832) 563-6713
Email: jaquifreund@mac.com
Web: TheRealtyGoddess.com

 

That’s a hangar?

Our hangar was delivered to our Waverly Acres Airpark home-site  this evening, at least the parts. Looks like a very complex IKEA project!

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Morton Buildings hangar delivery

 

Weather permitting, the hangar will be assembled within the next week or two.  Add the bi-fold hangar door, concrete slab, electric and plumbing, and we’re airplane ready.

Happy flying, 

~Jaqui

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Black Gumbo

What is black gumbo?  Might surprise you to learn that it’s not a spicy, Cajun-inspired stew but a type of soil common in parts of Texas.  Also called Houston Black or Texas Vertisol, this sticky, heavy clay can wreak havoc on concrete building foundations, especially during drought or heavy rains, because it expands when wet and and contracts when dry much like a sponge.  

You guessed it, our 2 acre airpark lot is good old Texas black gumbo!  To prevent cracked slabs, a crew removed the top layer of soil from our home and hangar sites.  Next, trucks hauled in load after load of select fill, a reddish soil containing the optimal mix of sand and clay.  The select fill was then leveled and compacted repeatedly with bulldozers and rollers to create the pads for both concrete foundations.

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Another load of select fill for our engineered house pad

Once our home’s pad passes two (or more) compact/moisture tests by a third party engineering service, work will start on the post-tension foundation specially designed to withstand our expansive, black gumbo home-site.  Homeowners in our area are advised to water foundations during summer dry spells to prevent cracking.

Our hangar is due for delivery mid-September, will keep you posted!

Happy flying,
~Jaqui

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